Regional Programs

Flavors: David Maplethorpe Leaving the Rex After 20 Years

Executive Chef David Maplethorpe retired from the Rex Bar and Grill the day after Valentine’s Day. With the sudden closing of the iconic restaurant, Maplethorpe exited earlier than his planned May 20th date, after fulfilling his commitments with the Montana State University Billings Wine and Food Festival.

Read More
(Photo by Marina Starr)

Declaring today as a "great day for American jobs," President Trump reversed an Obama administration decision and issued a permit to continue building the $8-billion-dollar Keystone XL pipeline

Some Eastern Montanan farmers and Fort Peck Reservation residents near the pipeline's route don't agree. They believe the environmental and social risk the pipeline poses is greater than a potentially short-lived economic boost for the state.

About two-dozen water protectors are walking across the Fort Peck Reservation this weekend to pray and demonstrate opposition of the pipeline's construction in the state.

Black Violin

Billings will be welcoming a unique musical duo Black Violin, to the Alberta Bair Theater next Thursday. The high-energy group is anything but common, and bridges the divide between hip-hop and classical music.

The Miami Herald says the musical duo Black Violin “upends cultural and musical stereotypes,” and these classically-trained string musicians will bring their inventive style to Billings next week.


(Photo by Lyman Gillen)

Community members have been gathering monthly at the Billings Public Library to discuss and reflect on Native American issues.

This month's lecture was by Aubrey Bertram, staff attorney for the Indian Law Practice group of the Montana Legal Services Association.

"I think it's so important to understand our context and to understand our history," said Bertram. "You can't meaningfully function and you can't really engage with present society if you don't understand how we got to where we are in the first place."

2017 Montana Legislature

Jackie Yamanaka

Senate Republicans are moving quickly on an infrastructure bill. The Senate Finance and Claims committee on a 15-3 vote Friday afternoon approved a nearly $99 million dollar bonding bill. The action sends Senate Bill 367 to the floor for debate.

The Bullock Administration supported the Senate bill but spoke against the House Republican’s infrastructure package this morning.

Jackie Yamanaka

The pace is picking up at the Montana Legislature. A Senate committee has begun its work on the state’s main budget bill, less than a week after receiving it from the House.

Welcome to Capitol Connections. I’m Jackie Yamanaka. This week, we’ll check in with Senate President Scott Sales, but first an update on funding for early childhood and special education.


Jackie Yamanaka

House Democrats say they won’t support a new House Republican infrastructure proposal that would issue bonds to pay for rural water, wastewater, some road and school projects.

When it comes to infrastructure at the Montana Legislature even a simple matter over whether there were negotiations on the topic is up for dispute.


Archives

After winning an election conducted amongst Hong Kong's biggest Beijing supporters, 59-year-old former civil servant Carrie Lam said her priority would be to "heal the divide" in Hong Kong society, vowing to form a government based on talent, not connections.

After more than two years of protests over the city's political future, this seemed to be what her city needed to hear, and saying the right thing at the right time was precisely what catapulted Lam to this position in the first place.

A shooting in a Cincinnati nightclub left 15 people wounded, one of them fatally, early on Sunday morning.

The number of victims could rise, however, because people were traveling to hospitals on their own, Cincinnati police Capt. Kim Williams said.

NBC affiliate WLWT reported that police officers outside the club heard gunshots around 1 a.m., as the Cameo Night Club was closing.

Assistant Police Chief Paul Neudigate has tweeted that there was "only one reported shooter," and that police are "still investigating if others [are] involved."

Filmmaker Maysaloun Hamoud does not like being typecast.

"The Israelis say, you don't look Arab or Palestinian," she says, rolling her eyes. "Huh? If I wear a dress or outfit that [doesn't look] religious, I cannot be a Palestinian? I have to be, like, exactly how you design me?"

Hamoud is 35, wearing a long skirt, tank top and rose-tinted sunglasses. The title of her acclaimed and controversial film Bar Bahar — or In Between in English — is tattooed in Arabic and English on her right forearm.

Our global health team has just finished up a series called "What Causes Pandemics? We Do." In radio and online stories, we looked at the causes behind our new hyperinfectious era. We'll continue covering this topic in future stories, but we thought our readers might want a chance to brush up on their pandemic facts. So roll up your sleeves, wash your hands and then try this quiz.

Married at 14 and divorced by 16, Seema Parveen had a marriage as brutal as it was short.

Now 42, Parveen remembers her husband threatening to hurl her from the balcony of their home. She blinks back tears recalling his rage when she bore him a daughter and not a son.

Duncan Hines, traveling salesman and future purveyor of boxed cake mix, considered himself an authority on a great many things: hot coffee, Kentucky country-cured ham and how to locate a tasty restaurant meal, in 1935, for under a dollar and a quarter.

By the 1950s, Hines' name would be plastered on boxes of cake mix; housewives would turn to his products for consistent quality and superior taste. Newspaper photographs featured Hines clad in a white chef's apron, hoisting a neatly frosted cake or thoughtfully dipping a spoon into a mixing bowl.

For Jernica Quiñones, the reality of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, hit close to home this year when a friend woke up on New Year's Day and discovered the lifeless body of her baby girl.

That's why Quiñones' 4-month-old son, Bless'n, has spent a lot of his life so far sleeping in a cardboard box.

The 33-year-old mother of five took part in a program in New Jersey that promotes safe sleep education through the distribution of "baby boxes" that double as bassinets.

Longtime conspiracy theorist and propagator Alex Jones has apologized to the Washington, D.C. pizzeria Comet Ping Pong and its owner James Alefantis for his show's role in promoting the false "pizzagate" conspiracy theory involving a child sex-abuse ring.

After yesterday's pulled health care vote, many on the left and the right are seeing it as a failure for Republicans — but former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay says it's actually a blessing in disguise.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Pages