Regional Programs

Flavors: David Maplethorpe Leaving the Rex After 20 Years

Executive Chef David Maplethorpe retired from the Rex Bar and Grill the day after Valentine’s Day. With the sudden closing of the iconic restaurant, Maplethorpe exited earlier than his planned May 20th date, after fulfilling his commitments with the Montana State University Billings Wine and Food Festival.

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(Photo by Marina Starr)

Declaring today as a "great day for American jobs," President Trump reversed an Obama administration decision and issued a permit to continue building the $8-billion-dollar Keystone XL pipeline

Some Eastern Montanan farmers and Fort Peck Reservation residents near the pipeline's route don't agree. They believe the environmental and social risk the pipeline poses is greater than a potentially short-lived economic boost for the state.

About two-dozen water protectors are walking across the Fort Peck Reservation this weekend to pray and demonstrate opposition of the pipeline's construction in the state.

Black Violin

Billings will be welcoming a unique musical duo Black Violin, to the Alberta Bair Theater next Thursday. The high-energy group is anything but common, and bridges the divide between hip-hop and classical music.

The Miami Herald says the musical duo Black Violin “upends cultural and musical stereotypes,” and these classically-trained string musicians will bring their inventive style to Billings next week.


(Photo by Lyman Gillen)

Community members have been gathering monthly at the Billings Public Library to discuss and reflect on Native American issues.

This month's lecture was by Aubrey Bertram, staff attorney for the Indian Law Practice group of the Montana Legal Services Association.

"I think it's so important to understand our context and to understand our history," said Bertram. "You can't meaningfully function and you can't really engage with present society if you don't understand how we got to where we are in the first place."

2017 Montana Legislature

Jackie Yamanaka

Senate Republicans are moving quickly on an infrastructure bill. The Senate Finance and Claims committee on a 15-3 vote Friday afternoon approved a nearly $99 million dollar bonding bill. The action sends Senate Bill 367 to the floor for debate.

The Bullock Administration supported the Senate bill but spoke against the House Republican’s infrastructure package this morning.

Jackie Yamanaka

The pace is picking up at the Montana Legislature. A Senate committee has begun its work on the state’s main budget bill, less than a week after receiving it from the House.

Welcome to Capitol Connections. I’m Jackie Yamanaka. This week, we’ll check in with Senate President Scott Sales, but first an update on funding for early childhood and special education.


Jackie Yamanaka

House Democrats say they won’t support a new House Republican infrastructure proposal that would issue bonds to pay for rural water, wastewater, some road and school projects.

When it comes to infrastructure at the Montana Legislature even a simple matter over whether there were negotiations on the topic is up for dispute.


Archives

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Comic Pete Holmes Draws On His Early Career And 'Churchy' Roots In 'Crashing': Holmes, who grew up a devout Christian, says he saw himself as a "Good Boy" comic in the early stages of his career. "I was basically picturing [Jesus] in the back of the club."

As Iraqi forces backed by the United States ramp up efforts to take Mosul back from ISIS, there are reports of scores of civilians killed by airstrikes from a U.S.-led coalition.

In a statement, the United States Central Command admitted that its airstrikes had hit an area where civilian casualties have been reported.

Political predictions are a dangerous business, especially this year. But it does look as though one way or another, the U.S. Senate will vote to confirm the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The open question is how much damage Democrats will do to their own long game in the process.

What Failure On Obamacare Repeal Means For Tax Reform

Mar 25, 2017

Even as they lick their wounds from a failed Affordable Care Act repeal effort, Republican leaders in Washington are looking ahead to the next battle — over taxes.

"I would say that we will probably start going very, very strongly for the big tax cuts and tax reform," President Trump told reporters Friday. "That will be next."

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan agreed, though he conceded that the defeat on health care was a setback.

"This does make tax reform more difficult," Ryan said. "But it does not in any way make it impossible."

Washington, D.C.'s Capital City Public Charter School feels like a mini United Nations. Many of the school's 981 students are first-generation Americans with backgrounds spanning the globe, from El Salvador to Nigeria to Vietnam. So when the staff of the literacy non-profit 826DC began a book-publishing project with the junior class, they picked a topic everyone could relate to that also left room for cultural expression: food.

Editor's Note: This story includes videos and descriptions of violent encounters between police and civilians, as well as language that may not be appropriate for all readers.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CITY GIRL")

UNIDENTIFIED GIRL: The following program was written in 2003 by a 12-year-old girl.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) "City Girl."

SARAH RAMOS: I'm Sarah Ramos. I am the creator of "City Girl."

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

The African Global Economic and Development Summit took place at the University of Southern California from March 16th to 18th.

None of the approximately 60 invited guests from Africa were able to attend.

The problem was that none of the African delegates were able to get U.S. visas.

Humphrey Mutaasa from the mayor's office in Kampala, Uganda, had organized a delegation of 11 business leaders from Uganda to attend the African Global Economic and Development Summit at the University of Southern California.

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