News

Jackie Yamanaka

Schools, the state of Montana, and local governments all benefit from revenue from coal, directly and indirectly.  Besides income and property taxes, there’s also the severance tax on coal.  Half of that tax revenue goes into the permanent Coal Severance Tax Trust. That money can’t be spent without approval from at least three-fourths of both the Montana House and Senate. The other 50% goes to the state’s general fund and a myriad of projects, including for the long-range building program, conservation districts, the state Library Commission, and the cultural trust.


Chet Johnson

Walt Longmire is the sheriff of a small, fictitious county in northern Wyoming.

His creator, award-winning author Craig Johnson, will be in Bozeman mid-March for an evening of reading, storytelling and autographs.

(Photo courtesy of the Office of Steve Daines)

The U.S. Senate today confirmed Montana's former Republican Congressman, Ryan Zinke, as Secretary of Interior. Zinke resigned his House seat following the 68 to 31 vote triggering a special election in Montana to fill his congressional seat. Governor Steve Bullock made that announcement this morning just minutes after Zinke's confirmation.

The Montana Department of Commerce announced on Tuesday they awarded a $400,000 grant to Garfield County Health Center in Jordan, Montana.

Anna Paige

In this first episode of Resounds: Arts and Culture on the High Plains, hosts Corby Skinner and Anna Paige focus on the visual mediums of sculpture.

Nail Chaput de Saintonge & Keith Graham

There is certainly power in numbers, but one single room is all you need for many elementary institutions across Montana. The Big Sky state has the most one-room schools in the nation.

Dan Rask, Executive Director of the Montana Small School Alliance, said one-room schools still exist in the 21st century because Montana has farm and ranch kids living far from town.

“I just don’t think it is in the cards to close those schools because they are too far to get to," Rask said.

Credit: Lori Iverson/USFWS

A Washington, D.C. resident was cited and fined $280 for disturbing approximately 1,500 wintering elk at the National Elk Refuge on Monday, Feb. 20.

According to a press release by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the drone operator launched his equipment from a pullout along North Highway 89 in Jackson, Wyoming.

Lori Iverson serves as the Outreach and Visitor Services coordinator for NER. She says that whether or not someone is flying a drone or walking too closely to wildlife, it can stress them to the point of impacting their overall survival.

"Winter is a really tough time of year, we need animals to conserve as much energy as they can and reduce those conflicts with humans," said Iverson.

National Park Service

Tourism opportunities can be better promoted in Indian country, said Senator Lea Whitford of Cut Bank.  Her Senate Bill 309 seeks to make sure Native voices are included on the Tourism Advisory Council and there’s money to help promote Indian Country because there is more to see than teepees and powwows.

Whitford said there’s also casinos, campgrounds, trails, fishing, heritage centers, museums, and art galleries.  


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