News

  • Vice President Mike Pence has arrived in Montana, where he will visit a coal mine on the Crow Indian Reservation before headlining an evening rally in support of Republican Greg Gianforte, who is seeking the state's only congressional seat
  • Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is scheduled to visit Montana next weekend to campaign for Democrat Rob Quist as he seeks a seat in the U.S. House
  • Montana beef producers say they can’t wait to regain access to the enormous Chinese market after a 13-year hiatus

  • Gov. Steve Bullock has signed a two-year, $10.3 billion budget that was a source of tension throughout the legislative session as he and lawmakers looked to close a revenue shortfall
  • U.S. Department of Justice officials say a new audit has uncovered problems with how the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation managed $2.3 million in federal grants intended to address violence against women, substance abuse and tribal justice.
  • Scientists in Toronto have named a newly identified dinosaur excavated from the Judith River Formation in Montana after a monster from the original Ghostbusters film

  

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Vice President Mike Pence and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke are scheduled to visit a coal mine on the Crow Reservation Friday. The Trump Administration has voiced its support for the coal industry, but spokesmen for the industry and an environmental organization aren’t certain what can be done to help that ailing energy source.

Two members of the Montana Board of Regents were at MSU-Billings Wednesday, May 10, 2017, to hear from faculty, staff and students on how to keep higher education affordable and accessible.

The regents are scheduled to meet later this month to set tuition and fees for the coming two years.

Courtesy of Jason Baldes

For the first time in 130 years, the Eastern Shoshone Tribe welcomed a newborn baby bison on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

The cute calf with high spiritual importance to the Eastern Shoshone was nearly eradicated by white settlers in the 19th century—so this spring birth marks a new approach and celebration of restorative justice.

Courtesy Sen. Steve Daines
Courtesy Sen. Steve Daines

U.S. Justice Department data shows Native women are 10 times as likely to be murdered as other Americans. They’re four times as likely to be raped or sexually assaulted. Yellowstone Public Radio's Brie Ripley and Montana Public Radio's Edward O'Brien report. 

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