Arts & Culture

Montana Human Rights Network

The Montana Human Rights Network says in the weeks after the general election it has seen an increase in the number of hate incidents. That is why the organization created an on-line hate activity reporting tool.

Jackie Yamanaka

  The staff and supporters of the Alberta Bair Theater are going to celebrate the tenure of William “Woody” Wood the way many theater goers remember him: on the stage, welcoming the crowd, and reminding them to turn off or silence their cell phone.

Wood is leaving Billings in July to join the Macomb Center for the Performing Arts and the Albert L. Lorenzo Cultural Center in Michigan as its director of cultural affairs.

Wood has been executive director at the ABT for nearly a decade.

“Shortly after I arrived the economy tanked,” he says.

Art Wolfe, Seattle WA

  A photograph of two Yellowstone Park bison is among the 16 Forever Stamp images  to be unveiled to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National park Service.

The image was captured by Art Wolfe of Seattle, Washington.

In a press release from Yellowstone National Park, Wolfe describes the setting for his photograph.

Art Wolfe, Seattle WA

A photograph of two Yellowstone Park bison is among the 16 Forever Stamp images  to be unveiled to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the National park Service.

The image was captured by Art Wolfe of Seattle, Washington.

Jackie Yamanaka

           U-S Magistrate Carolyn Ostby was the first to welcome 25 people from 16 countries as new U.S. Citizens. Ostby presided over the naturalization ceremony at the James F. Battin Federal Courthouse in Billings, Montana.

She says while the new citizens swore to abandon all allegiance to the government of any foreign state or country, they don’t have to give up their love of the country or the people where they were born.

Jackie Yamanaka

An art exhibition, readings, a jazz improvisation performance are just a few of the launching points meant to inspire contemplation and a community conversation about water.

Artist Sherri Cornett is the force behind the project titled “Flow.”

During her hikes around the region, she became inspired by water.

“Where I’ve taken time to sit down by the water and really take in the calming effects, thinking about, meditating about water,” she says.