Arts & Culture

Books make good gifts for children because it is important to have books in the home, said Cindy Patterson, the Children’s Librarian at Billings Public Library. She spoke recently with Kay Erickson about the importance of reading to children, having books in the home  and gave some book  gift  suggestions. 

“But if the books are not readily available, if it is 30 below and a trip to the library is not possible, you need to have books in the home you can just grab and have one ready to go so that you can read,” said Patterson.

(Photo courtesy of Mary Hernandez)

Billings Gazette editor Darrell Ehrlick was raised Methodist, studied religion as an undergraduate, then attended seminary. Now he's Muslim. YPR's Brie Ripley spoke with Ehrlick about why he took pen to his opinion column to announce his decision to convert.


Montana Human Rights Network

The Montana Human Rights Network says in the weeks after the general election it has seen an increase in the number of hate incidents. That is why the organization created an on-line hate activity reporting tool.

Tin Soldiers is a movie about people overcoming physical challenges to excel at adaptive sports. 

There will be a special screening of this independent movie on Monday night, Dec. 5, 2016, in Billings, as a fundraiser for Eagle Mount, a program to enhance the lives of those with disabilities through recreation.

Ben Duffy, one of the film’s producers, says this film is about people who push themselves to accomplish something in athletics that others rarely do and with passion.

Opportunity Link

Arts and culture along the Montana Hi-Line are getting a big financial boost thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The $100,000  Our Town  grant was awarded two years ago to Opportunity Link  in Havre, to plan a Hi-Line Arts Trail and develop a mobile app that will draw attention and tourists to the area.

The Hi-Line Arts Trail project is just getting started. Rosie Goldich, Opportunity Link project coordinator , said they are seeking applications from the Hi-Line,  from Glacier to Phillips counties.

Hatred is a learned behavior. Racism is a learned behavior. 
How do we instead teach our children to love, empathize, and include?

The Montana Racial Equity Project is hosting a series of free workshops in Bozeman Monday, November 28, to teach parents how to talk to their children about race.


It is one of the most famous and beautiful highways in the country. But few know the history of the iconic Beartooth Highway.  Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Billings Public Library, people will get a chance of hear the details of this engineering marvel.

Jon Axline is Montana Department of Transportation historian and author of a book on the highway. He says its scenic qualities may not have been the goal of its construction. It was intended to divert mining trucks from going though Yellowstone National Park and coming out at the railroad station in Red Lodge. And he says Red Lodge even  had big plans to build a smelter.

(Photo Courtesy of Forward Montana)
(Photo Courtesy of Forward Montana)

When Last Best News journalist Ed Kemmick broke the story about hateful comments posted online by a Bilings business owner, he wasn't expecting the online news site to crash, too.

YPR's Brie Ripley spoke with Kemmick and Forward Montana Deputy Director Kiah Abbey about hatespeech, bigotry, and how to be a good neighbor.


(Photo courtesy of Pete Tolton)
(Photo courtesy of Pete Tolton)

Wild places can sometimes get overlooked; certainly by their very nature they're tough to reach, tough to experience.

That's why Billings-based filmmakers Pete Tolton and Charlie Smillie have teamed up with the Montana Wilderness Association to produce a documentary debuting tomorrow that offers viewers a chance to experience the elusive prairie lands of central Montana.

Charles M. Bair Family Museum

It’s a chance to go “behind the scenes” and see how one of Montana’s most famous and wealthy families really lived.

This Saturday, Nov. 12 is the fifth annual Upstairs Downstairs at the Charles M. Bair Family Museum in Martinsdale. 

It’s a rare opportunity for visitors go upstairs to the private family living quarters off limits during regular tours.

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