Arts & Culture

Knar Bedian

If you missed the Mar. 31, 2017 show, we've compiled a YouTube playlist consisting of most of the songs featured in the vain of "April Fools Day." 

Jay Hahnkamp is an unlikely children’s author. He’s a rancher with a small place near southwest Montana, and he has two children’s books to his name.

His most recent book carries a simple message: no matter the obstacles in life, a child can strive to be whatever he or she wants to be. This message is carried by the author’s real-life cow and best friend the goat.  


(Courtesy of Billings Symphony, Jeni Fleming)

On this episode of Resounds: Arts and Culture on the High Plains, co-hosts Anna Paige and Corby Skinner explore music and mentorship with Anne Harrigan, Director of the Billings Symphony Orchestra and Chorale, and Jeni Fleming, a Bozeman-based jazz vocalist and piano instructor.


"Phone Therapy"

Apr 4, 2017

I was relief, once, for a doctor on vacation

and got a call from a man on a window sill.

This was New York, a dozen stories up.

He was going to kill himself, he said.

I said everything I could think of.

And when nothing worked, when the guy

was still determined to slide out that window

and smash his delicate skull

on the indifferent sidewalk, "Do you think,"

I asked, "you could just postpone it

until Monday, when Dr. Lewis gets back?"

The cord that connected us—strung

High Noon is an iconic western movie that starred Montana’s own Gary Cooper. It was filmed in 1951 during the height of the Red Scare and the blacklisting of American Communist Party members in Hollywood

For Pulitzer Prize winning author Glenn Frankel, the movie was the perfect blend of Hollywood and politics of the 1950s and how the tumultuous time played a role in this great Western.


russellrowland.com, shannray.com

Russell Rowland and Shann Ray are two of Montana’s most prolific contemporary writers. On this episode of Resounds, they talk with Corby Skinner and Anna Paige about the character of place.

Black Violin

Billings will be welcoming a unique musical duo Black Violin, to the Alberta Bair Theater next Thursday. The high-energy group is anything but common, and bridges the divide between hip-hop and classical music.

The Miami Herald says the musical duo Black Violin “upends cultural and musical stereotypes,” and these classically-trained string musicians will bring their inventive style to Billings next week.


(Photo by Lyman Gillen)

Community members have been gathering monthly at the Billings Public Library to discuss and reflect on Native American issues.

This month's lecture was by Aubrey Bertram, staff attorney for the Indian Law Practice group of the Montana Legal Services Association.

"I think it's so important to understand our context and to understand our history," said Bertram. "You can't meaningfully function and you can't really engage with present society if you don't understand how we got to where we are in the first place."

Executive Chef David Maplethorpe retired from the Rex Bar and Grill the day after Valentine’s Day. With the sudden closing of the iconic restaurant, Maplethorpe exited earlier than his planned May 20th date, after fulfilling his commitments with the Montana State University Billings Wine and Food Festival. 

photo courtesy Arthouse Cinema and Pub

In downtown Billings, two unique spaces have found new life as venues for the arts. What was once a Greyhound Bus depot is now Pub Station, a live music venue, and the old Center Lanes bowling alley has become the home of Arthouse Cinema and Pub.


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