Arts & Culture

Brie Ripley

Big Sky Pride transformed Billings into an epicenter of glitter, rainbows, music and solidarity between LGBTQI+-identifying folks and straight allies over the weekend.

Mountain Time Arts

A series of art events and performances celebrating water, called Upstream, begin tomorrow in the Gallatin Valley. One of the organizers, Dede Taylor, said it is an intersection of art and the science of water.

“With climate change we have a situation that is unfathomable in some ways for us as humans," said Taylor. "And I think we need all the tools available. And art and imagination is a crucial tool for how we look to the future of the planet.”

Courtesy of Shauna Goubeaux.

Big Sky Pride kicks off today in Billings. It’s the first time in nine years that the state’s annual pride festivities will take place in our region’s largest urban center. YPR’s Brie Ripley spoke with members of the festival planning committee about the festival’s history and what folks can expect from this weekend’s celebration.

Courtesy of Cara Chamberlain and Bernie Quetchenbach

In the acknowledgements of Cara Chamberlain’s recently published book of poetry, Lament of the Antichrist in a Secular World and Other Poems, she credits her husband Bernie Quetchenbach—who is also a writer—with saving her many embarrassments. Similarly, in Quetchenbach's newly-published book of essays, Accidental Gravity: Residents, Travelers, and the Landscape of Memory, he mentions gratitude to Chamberlain for her patience and support and for reading every word of the manuscript—including thousands that are no longer there. 


If you step into one of the ritzier vacation lodges in Montana this summer, chances are you’ll spy the tan shafts and white tips of antlers, maybe in the chandelier hanging from the ceiling, or the throne-like chair in the corner, maybe even serving as a handle on a cabinet door.

These accents fuel a multi-million dollar cottage industry in the West that supports artists and backcountry scavengers alike. I spent a few days this spring tracking down the origins of unique antler furnishings. 

H.P. Lovecraft, the early 1900s horror writer, is best known for his creation of the deity Cthulhu — a monster of great power who sleeps in the Pacific Ocean in the sunken city of R'lyeh.

Now, almost 100 years after its conception, Cthulhu is making a creepy comeback via a new crop of board games.

Volume 5, Plate 160, 1908
Edward S. Curtis Collection / Charles M. Bair Family Museum

Unique Images of North American Indians and tribal landscapes are on display  throughout the summer at the Charles M Bair Family Museum in Martinsdale, Montana.

It a major exhibition from the Bair collection called, The Shadow Catcher: Edward Sheriff Curtis.

The images are photogravures. Basically, it is a printmaking process that starts with a photo negative, where the image is etched to a copper plate, then printed.

Photography documents life — and food, whether in the fore or background, seems to always be in the picture. The two intersect in a new book, Feast for the Eyes, written by photography curator Susan Bright and published by Aperture.

Courtesy of Nick Ferrington

For time immemorial, political and social happenings often fuel folks prone to fiery bursts of creativity. For full-time party DJ and producer Nick Ferrington, who's also known as DJ Nick Minaj, the audio of Greg Gianforte assaulting reporter Ben Jacobs sparked the brand new dance track Gianforte (Bodyslam).


Flickr Creative Commons

In this Blue Light Boogie set we hear some of Host Art Hooker's most inspired playlists yet. You'll have to play along to guess where the inspiration is coming from -- and it's well worth the effort!

Blue Light Boogie is live on YPR Fridays from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Tune in or stream it from your desktop or mobile device.

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