Government & Politics

Jackie Yamanaka

Retired state district judge Russ Fagg made it official:  he’s a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate. The announcement comes after a 4 month exploratory effort that Democrats have called a stealth campaign.   

"I love the people of the state," says Fagg, standing on a flatbed trailer parked in a helicopter hanger at Billings Flying Service. "I love the natural beauty of the state and so tonight for the very first time I am publicly announcing that I am going to run for the U.S. Senate."

As part of his settlement with a reporter he was convicted of assaulting earlier this year, Montana's lone congressman Greg Gianforte donated $50,000 to the Committee To Protect Journalists.

It’s a well-respected, non-partisan group that advocates for the rights and lives of reporters across the globe.

But now that group is saying they are disappointed with the congressman after a brief meeting. 

Jackie Yamanaka

Republican legislative leaders are skeptical that the Bullock Administration's revenue projections are correct. Because of that they told reporters during a conference call Wednesday it is premature to talk about a special legislative session to address the state budget.


Gianforte
Edward O'Brien / MTPR

Montana’s lone congressman Greg Gianforte has clarified his stance on modifying weapons with so-called bump stocks.


After Sunday night’s mass shooting in Las Vegas, gun control has yet again become a hot topic among U.S. lawmakers. But this time some top Republicans and the National Rifle Association are hinting they may support additional regulations on  bump stock modifications for assault rifles.

Republican congressman Greg Gianforte has offered an "off-the-record" meeting with Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs.
Louise Johns

Republican congressman Greg Gianforte continues to refuse an interview with the reporter he assaulted last May.  While the Guardian’s Ben Jacobs recently put the thumbscrews to Gianforte, taking to Twitter and interviews with other national publications, the issue remains a stalemate.


Jackie Yamanaka

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Montana Senator Max Baucus says there’s insufficient critical thinking today.  He says for many, it’s easier to watch or read the news they agree with.  Baucus says as Senator he strove to meet with those who didn’t always agree with him. 

“I love walking into a lion’s den. It’s a challenge,” Baucus says. “You learn something. And basically, they might learn something too.”

Courtesy image

A legal advocacy organization that represents low-income people says nearly every state has a law that requires the suspension of a driver’s license for nonpayment of court costs and fines. Legal challenges have been filed in 5 states challenging such laws, including in Montana.

The Legal Aid Justice Center in Virginia released those findings in report released today.


Grant Kier for Congress campaign

The former executive director of an organization that works to preserve open space in western Montana is the latest candidate to enter the Democratic primary for the U.S. House.  Grant Kier thinks that experience will serve Montanans well in Congress.

He spent the past decade as the executive director of Five Valleys Land Trust, before that with the Bitter Root Land Trust. The former well site geologist says he’s learned an important lesson from his time in the non-profit world.


Montana Motor Vehicle Divison

  The Montana Department of Justice is asking U.S. Homeland Security for more time to comply with the REAL ID Act, the 2005 federal law passed in the wake of 9/11 requiring stricter identification before boarding an airplane.

Montana is approaching an October 10 deadline when standard state driver’s licenses will no longer be acceptable forms of ID when visiting a military base or most other federal facilities. The current deadline would also require people to use an upgraded ID to board a plane by the end of January.

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