Brie Ripley

All Things Considered Host

Phone: 406-657-2972
Email: brie@ypradio.org
Twitter: @brieripley

Brie Ripley learned to make radio as an intern for KNKX's Sound Effect and KUOW's ​The Record; she was mentored by podcast producer Arwen Nicks and managing editor/producer Jeannie Yandel. 

She holds a BA in Journalism from the University of Washington (2015) and studied radio storytelling at the Transom Traveling Workshop (2016).

Raised in Seattle, Ripley spent childhood summers at camp in Yellowstone Valley.
She joined Yellowstone Public Radio's news team in 2016.

The Big Sky Documentary Film Festival will experiment with programming sans visuals for the first time this year.

That's because audio producer and University of Montana journalism professor, Jule Banville, knows there's a demand for Montana-made audio documentaries. After piloting the successful Last Best Podcast Festival last fall, Banville sought a way to do something like that again on a larger scale.

(Flickr/Lee Crosbie) https://flic.kr/p/djyeWd

Great Falls Tribune Crime Reporter, Seaborn Larson, often pairs mug shots with his stories. He has several concerns about a Montana measure that would bar public release of mug shots until after a person is convicted of a crime. 

(Courtesy of Women's March Montana)/(https://www.womensmarchmontana.com/)

This Saturday, people across the state are headed to the Capitol in Helena to participate in the Women's March on Montana in conjunction with marches across the world.

Many are traveling from southeastern Montana, for different reasons, but united by a common message: Women's rights are human rights.


(Brie Ripley)

25-years-ago, a New York Times reporter traveled to Montana to interview Gwen Kircher for a story on race in America.

Based on award winning journalist Dirk Johnson's original article, and in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, YPR's Brie Ripley shares this audio postcard on what life's like, presently, for a black woman in a predominately white state.


(Flickr/ Tim Evanson) (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/fcaznD

Washington state is refusing to allow its aquatic lands to be used for a major coal-export terminal along the Columbia River.

Outgoing Washington Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark announced Tuesday that he has rejected a request from Northwest Alloys to sublease the state’s aquatic lands to Millennium Bulk Terminals for the coal-export terminal

The denial of the land sublease is a critical blow to the proposed coal port in Longview, Washington, which would mean 16 additional mile-and-a-half-long coal trains per day rolling through Montana and Wyoming on their way to the coast.


University of Montana

University of Montana’s longest serving president, George Dennison, died today at age 81.

Dennison retired from the university in 2010 after serving as president for 20 years — the longest tenure of any UM president.

To listen to the full-length version of his speech, featured in the audio clip below, click here.


The 2017 legislative session convenes Jan. 1, 2016 in Helena with several proposals on the docket related to Montana wildlands. YPR's Brie Ripley spoke with Eastern Field Director of the Montana Wilderness Association, Charlie Smillie, about the most important issue on his mind.


Federal land managers say at least six sites within Montana's Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument should be eligible for listing as historic places.

The sites were evaluated after a federal court determined the U.S. Bureau of Land Management designated hundreds of miles of roads within the monument without reviewing the potential impacts to historical resources.


(Courtesy of Brie Ripley)

Sometimes they're on the streets.
Sometimes they live out of a car.

Other time's it's motel rooms,
shelters, or sheds.

As of Dec. 15, Billings School District 2 identified 385 homeless youth. They are the kids Operation Billings Child aim to serve.


Caitlin Cromwell

23 year-old Billings artist Phil Griffin went to Standing Rock from the standpoint of someone concerned over human-caused climate change. Upon arrival, however, Griffin soon learned more about himself and his blind spot for his own white privilege.


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