Brie Ripley

All Things Considered Host

When Brie Ripley isn't focused on radio, she's paying attention to the hum of mountains, badlands, and prairies. She joined the YPR news team in October 2016.

Email her:   brie@ypradio.org
Follow her on Twitter:  @brieripley

Hatred is a learned behavior. Racism is a learned behavior. 
How do we instead teach our children to love, empathize, and include?

The Montana Racial Equity Project is hosting a series of free workshops in Bozeman Monday, November 28, to teach parents how to talk to their children about race.


(Photo Courtesy of Forward Montana)
(Photo Courtesy of Forward Montana)

When Last Best News journalist Ed Kemmick broke the story about hateful comments posted online by a Bilings business owner, he wasn't expecting the online news site to crash, too.

YPR's Brie Ripley spoke with Kemmick and Forward Montana Deputy Director Kiah Abbey about hatespeech, bigotry, and how to be a good neighbor.


(Photo Courtesy of Alexander Newby/@TeaRoadTiger)
(Photo Courtesy of Alexander Newby/@TeaRoadTiger)

Demonstrators across the nation rallied Tuesday, November 15 to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. In Bozeman, over 300 people answered the call outside the courthouse.

Montana State University student Amber Noseep was one of them.
She spoke to YPR's Brie Ripley about the most surprising part of the protest.


(Photo courtesy of Pete Tolton)
(Photo courtesy of Pete Tolton)

Wild places can sometimes get overlooked; certainly by their very nature they're tough to reach, tough to experience.

That's why Billings-based filmmakers Pete Tolton and Charlie Smillie have teamed up with the Montana Wilderness Association to produce a documentary debuting tomorrow that offers viewers a chance to experience the elusive prairie lands of central Montana.

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