Corin Cates-Carney

Corin Cates-Carney is the Flathead Valley reporter for MTPR.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Following the collapse of the state budget last year, lawmakers are considering changing how the state plans out its budgeting process. However, a proposal from the state budget director on the topic doesn't seem to be receiving support from Republican finance leaders.

Revenue projections indicate the state will likely have enough money at the end of the fiscal year to backfill $45 million in cuts made to state agencies during last year’s special legislative session.

“We are extremely hopeful,” says Representative Nancy Ballance, the Republican chair of the Legislative Finance Committee, which met Monday morning.

The Montana Broadcasters Association is still planning to hold its Senate candidate debate Sunday in Whitefish, but only one candidate is going to be there.

Republican Matt Rosendale reportedly backed out of the debate after saying he’d be there. His campaign later said the debate conflicted with Rosendale’s Father’s Day plans and it was scheduled without his input.

Montana has just over $4 million in its firefighting reserve fund at the start of what’s expected to be ripe conditions for a substantial fire season. That means the state is significantly short of having the cash on hand needed cover the costs of even an average season. 

But Governor Steve Bullock says fire suppression won’t be limited this season, despite depleted funding reserves.

There’s a potential problem with how Montana determines which schools will get special assistance under the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind law. It’s with how schools handle basic student attendance records.

Leaders of Montana’s K-12 public schools system will update state lawmakers Thursday morning about progress on rolling out the replacement for the federal No Child Left Behind Act following cuts to education funding last year.

The Office of Public Instruction plans to brief lawmakers on the schools identified this spring as the lowest performing five percent in the state.

Editor's Note: This post was updated at 3:30 p.m., Friday, June 8, 2018. 

Governor Steve Bullock signed an executive order Friday aimed at reforming dark money campaign contributions.

State Auditor Matthew Rosendale is the Republican nominee to take on two-term Democratic Senator Jon Tester this November.

Shortly before midnight Rosendale walked onto a stage in the Radisson Colonial Hotel in Helena, accepting victory and promising to fight for and work alongside President Trump.

Rosendale says it’s time to send President Trump conservative reinforcement in the nation's capital.

“What’s good for our nation is great for Montana,” Rosendale said, to cheers from supporters.

Numbers in a new state revenue report mean Montana could likely restore some of the cuts made during last year’s budget crisis. At least that’s how one prominent Republican state lawmaker is interpreting them. 

A U-S Supreme court decision expected in the coming weeks could deal a big blow to Montana’s public sector unions. The decision could make Montana a so-called ‘Right-to-Work’ state in the public sector, costing the state’s biggest union membership, revenue, and bargaining power.

Pages