Jackie Yamanaka

Senior Political Reporter/Special Projects

Jackie Yamanaka has been news director at YPR since 1986.  From her home base in Billings, Jackie covers a wide range of issues across Montana and Wyoming. During the Montana Legislative session, she re-locates to the state Capitol in Helena where she has another office.

During her tenure she has won numerous journalism awards from Public Radio News Directors, Inc.; The Society of Professional Journalists, The Montana Broadcaster’s Association EB Craney Awards; The Montana Associated Press; and elsewhere.

Jackie received a degree in Mass Communications from Eastern Montana College (now Montana State University Billings).  She is secretary of the Montana Freedom of Information Hotline (http://www.montanafoi.org/) and a past board member of Public Radio News Directors, Inc.  When she’s not working she enjoys running and hiking with her dogs, fishing, shooting sporting clays, and playing tennis.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy image

A legal advocacy organization that represents low-income people says nearly every state has a law that requires the suspension of a driver’s license for nonpayment of court costs and fines. Legal challenges have been filed in 5 states challenging such laws, including in Montana.

The Legal Aid Justice Center in Virginia released those findings in report released today.


Grant Kier for Congress campaign

The former executive director of an organization that works to preserve open space in western Montana is the latest candidate to enter the Democratic primary for the U.S. House.  Grant Kier thinks that experience will serve Montanans well in Congress.

He spent the past decade as the executive director of Five Valleys Land Trust, before that with the Bitter Root Land Trust. The former well site geologist says he’s learned an important lesson from his time in the non-profit world.


Jackie Yamanaka

A film describing what it was like to grow up in Missoula, the son of a Presbyterian minister who held two things sacred–God and fly-fishing–had its world premiere in 1992 in Bozeman, Montana.

25-years later, a festival was held to recognize how Norman Maclean's modest novella captured his family’s troubled story, and introduced a worldwide audience to the beauty of Montana, its rivers, and fly fishing.

"In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean" was a 3-day festival that wrapped up Sunday in Missoula. It was held to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the release of the movie, “A River Runs Through It.”

NPS/Jim Peaco

Bison, grizzlies, and Old Faithful are among the features that draw people to visit and live in the region around Yellowstone National Park. A new journalism site has launched to help people better understand this place where many live and play

courtesy of the Wheeler Center

The former U.S. Ambassador to China, who's also Montana’s longest serving U.S. Senator, is expected to comment on the future of Obamacare and North Korea during a public event next month at Montana State University.

Office of Governor Matt Mead

Wyoming Governor Matt Mead spoke with international and national business leaders in Jackson about ways to diversify the state’s economy, and get off the boom and bust rollercoaster.

Heenan for Congress

Billings attorney John Heenan says Washington, D.C. is corrupt and that the current Congressman is part of the system that rewards money over people.  

Heenan says that’s just one of many reasons why he decided to announce his candidacy for the U.S. House. He says the tipping point was what happened after Congressman Greg Gianforte (R-MT) admitted to assaulting Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs.

The National Interagency Fire Center provides information on wildfires burning across the United States.

Jackie Yamanaka

Montana’s two U.S. Senators disagree with the decision to abandon work on health care to focus on other legislative priorities. 

Tuesday’s announcement comes after yet another failure by the Republican majority to scrap the Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare.

Creative Commons Flickr www.medisave.co.uk.

The GOP leadership in the U.S. Senate may have put the health care issue on the back burner, but it is a campaign issue in Montana’s upcoming U.S. Senate race.

The latest Republican to enter U.S. Senate race has run aggressive statewide political campaigns in the past. So it comes as no surprise he didn’t pull any punches against incumbent U.S. Senator Jon Tester, D-MT, right out of the gate during his campaign announcement Monday.

“He was the one that cast the deciding vote that forced Obamacare on each and every person on the state of Montana originally,” said Rosendale. “So that’s sort of like the Arsonist trying to blame the fire department because they’re not doing a good enough job.”

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