Kay Erickson

Morning Edition Host

Kay Erickson has been working in broadcasting in Billings for more than 20 years. She spent well over a decade as news assignment editor at KTVQ-TV before joining the staff at YPR. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University, with a degree in broadcast journalism. Shortly after graduation she worked in Great Falls where she was one of the first female sports anchor and reporter in Montana.

Kay is also a writer for Yellowstone Valley Woman’s Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Two members of the Montana Board of Regents were at MSU-Billings Wednesday, May 10, 2017, to hear from faculty, staff and students on how to keep higher education affordable and accessible.

The regents are scheduled to meet later this month to set tuition and fees for the coming two years.

Geology.Com

How do you become reacquainted with your native state when you have been gone for 25 years?

Road trip.

And it became the most recent book, Fifty-six Counties: A Montana Journey, for author Russell Rowland.


From Me To You

Apr 28, 2017
Credit Judy Hudgins, Lewis and Clark Library

In this world of instant communications with Twitter, text, and emails, there are still those people who enjoy and want to share the charm and tradition of handwriting a card or letter.

The U.S. Postal Service designated April National Card and Letter Writing Month in 2001. In recognition, the Lewis and Clark Library is hosting an event on the last day of this month for would be letter writers.


https://flic.kr/p/a5Gx5x

A library card from the Bozeman Public Library allows you to borrow books, movies, download music and checkout seeds.

Kit Stephenson is the head of the Adult Services and Outreach at the Bozeman Library. She says the tradition in libraries has been sharing information and sharing resources. “And now seeds,” Stephenson said.


Jay Hahnkamp is an unlikely children’s author. He’s a rancher with a small place near southwest Montana, and he has two children’s books to his name.

His most recent book carries a simple message: no matter the obstacles in life, a child can strive to be whatever he or she wants to be. This message is carried by the author’s real-life cow and best friend the goat.  


High Noon is an iconic western movie that starred Montana’s own Gary Cooper. It was filmed in 1951 during the height of the Red Scare and the blacklisting of American Communist Party members in Hollywood

For Pulitzer Prize winning author Glenn Frankel, the movie was the perfect blend of Hollywood and politics of the 1950s and how the tumultuous time played a role in this great Western.


Black Violin

Billings will be welcoming a unique musical duo Black Violin, to the Alberta Bair Theater next Thursday. The high-energy group is anything but common, and bridges the divide between hip-hop and classical music.

The Miami Herald says the musical duo Black Violin “upends cultural and musical stereotypes,” and these classically-trained string musicians will bring their inventive style to Billings next week.


MSUB University Relations

We live in a democracy, but what exactly does that mean? And how does the American system of government differ from others around the world?

Democracies will be under the microscope in the new spring lecture series “Frontiers of Democracy: Exploring the Past and Looking to the Future” at the Montana State University Billing Library.

Chet Johnson

Walt Longmire is the sheriff of a small, fictitious county in northern Wyoming.

His creator, award-winning author Craig Johnson, will be in Bozeman mid-March for an evening of reading, storytelling and autographs.

Nail Chaput de Saintonge & Keith Graham

There is certainly power in numbers, but one single room is all you need for many elementary institutions across Montana. The Big Sky state has the most one-room schools in the nation.

Dan Rask, Executive Director of the Montana Small School Alliance, said one-room schools still exist in the 21st century because Montana has farm and ranch kids living far from town.

“I just don’t think it is in the cards to close those schools because they are too far to get to," Rask said.

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