Nate Hegyi

Reporter

Nate Hegyi is a reporter with the Mountain West News Bureau based at Yellowstone Public Radio. He earned an M.A. in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism in 2016 and interned at NPR’s Morning Edition in 2014. In a prior life, he toured around the country in a band, lived in Texas for a spell, and once tried unsuccessfully to fly fish.

Ways to Connect

Montana’s Republican Senator Steve Daines helped reintroduce a bipartisan bill Tuesday that would bring high-speed internet to rural parts of the state.

In a press release, Daines says the bill cuts red tape and better allows companies, state and local governments to install broadband infrastructure on federal land.

A new coalition called “Our Land, Our Legacy” says it plans to fight against Daines’ bill with social media messages and an advertising campaign.
Jason Crotty-CC-BY-2

Montana Wilderness advocates are launching a campaign in opposition to a bill introduced by the state’s Republican Senator Steve Daines. If passed, that bill would eliminate protections for some federal lands in Montana.

Visitors to Yellowstone National Park can now purchase entrance passes online instead of in person. Normally, visitors to the nation’s oldest national park had to pony up cash or a credit card to a ranger if they wanted to get in.

Visitors to Yellowstone National Park can now purchase entrance passes online instead of in person. Normally, visitors to the nation’s oldest national park had to pony up cash or a credit card to a ranger if they wanted to get in.

Montana Wilderness advocates are launching a campaign in opposition to a bill introduced by the state’s Republican Senator Steve Daines. If passed, that bill would eliminate protections for some federal lands in Montana.

A federal judge says the government will need to take a second look at whether Yellowstone National Park bison should be protected under the Endangered Species Act.

"This is the first step in what I think is going to be a long fight," says Ken Cole, is the director of the Buffalo Field Campaign, a group advocating for bison protection.

Thousands of people who are in the U.S. illegally are allowed to stay every year because they've been victims of crime. The number of people who apply for a “U visa” far outnumbers the slots made available, and that’s created a backlog. And some people can’t even get on the list because they lack one piece of paper from police. For one Mexican man in Montana, the lack of a U visa means he'll soon be deported.

Thousands of people who are in the U.S. illegally are allowed to stay every year because they've been victims of crime. The number of people who apply for a “U visa” far outnumbers the slots made available, and that’s created a backlog. And some people can’t even get on the list because they lack one piece of paper from police. For one undocumented immigrant in Montana, the lack of a U visa means he'll soon be deported.  

On a windy and unseasonably warm winter day in Yellowstone National Park in Montana, spokeswoman Morgan Warthin stands in the middle of a massive, empty valley.

"Yellowstone is so big," she says. "Where do you begin to look?"

She is searching for any of the 52 bison that were set free from two holding pens in mid-January.

Authorities say the bison escaped after somebody used bolt cutters to open up a fence. They soon scattered across an area larger than Delaware, and officials have launched a criminal investigation to find out what happened.

Montana’s Democratic Senator Jon Tester is part of a bipartisan group of lawmakers trying to strike a new deal with the White House on border security.

Tester this week met with the Secretary of Homeland Security and a bipartisan group of lawmakers. He’s hoping to help push a border security plan through Congress as part of a long-term budget agreement.

Pages