Nate Hegyi

Reporter

Nate Hegyi is a reporter with the Mountain West News Bureau based at Yellowstone Public Radio. He earned an M.A. in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism in 2016 and interned at NPR’s Morning Edition in 2014. In a prior life, he toured around the country in a band, lived in Texas for a spell, and once tried unsuccessfully to fly fish.

Ways to Connect

Nate Hegyi / YPR

When low-income people need help getting food stamps, Medicaid and other benefits, they often go to Montana’s public assistance offices. But at the end of this month, more than half of these offices will permanently close because of state budget cuts. This includes one in Livingston, which serves more than 300 people every month.

The Northern Cheyenne tribe joined a coalition of environmental groups Monday in requesting a federal judge reinstate Endangered Species Act protections for the Yellowstone-area grizzly bear.

The animal was delisted last summer, but the coalition says the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s recent reopening of public comment of that delisting is evidence the government didn’t finish its homework before removing protections.

A photo shared on Twitter by Matt Rosendale in October 2017 / Twitter

A candidate for U.S. Senate in Montana who received an endorsement by former White House strategist Steve Bannon is keeping quiet after Bannon made comments critical of President Trump.

USDA NRCS

While coal production is down nationwide, a new report says it still brings a lot of money to Montana. 

Private contractors who take care of Montanans with developmental disabilities are losing state contracts due to Montana’s budget woes. This means many case managers across the state are losing their jobs, and small town service providers are grappling with how to provide care on a reduced budget.

HDRC

In recent years, Montana’s fastest-growing city, Bozeman, has also seen a rise in the number of people who are homeless. Expensive housing and stagnant wages may be to blame.

Private contractors who take care of Montanans with developmental disabilities are losing state contracts due to Montana’s budget woes. This means many case managers across the state are losing their jobs, and small town service providers are grappling with how to provide care on a reduced budget.

Coal
Kym Farnik / Flickr

One day after a beleaguered coal company’s stocks soared on news its Montana mine expansion project was approved by the federal government, the Interior Department now says that approval actually didn’t happen.

In recent years, Montana’s fastest-growing city, Bozeman, has also seen a rise in the number of people who are homeless. Expensive housing and stagnant wages may be to blame.

Democratic state representative Jim Hamilton says the loss in funding affects local school districts, mental health and disability services in Gallatin County.
Nate Hegyi / YPR

Montana’s ongoing budget crisis has hit Gallatin County, where state Democrats say schools, mental health and disabilities services could all be affected.

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