Environment & Energy

Caitlin Cromwell

23 year-old Billings artist Phil Griffin went to Standing Rock from the standpoint of someone concerned over human-caused climate change. Upon arrival, however, Griffin soon learned more about himself and his blind spot for his own white privilege.


(Photo Courtesy of Alexander Newby/@TeaRoadTiger)
(Photo Courtesy of Alexander Newby/@TeaRoadTiger)

Demonstrators across the nation rallied Tuesday, November 15 to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. In Bozeman, over 300 people answered the call outside the courthouse.

Montana State University student Amber Noseep was one of them.
She spoke to YPR's Brie Ripley about the most surprising part of the protest.


Jackie Yamanaka

The former chief executive of Cargill said when it comes to talking about climate change, he wanted to be provocative without provoking the nearly 300 farmers and ranchers in attendance at the annual Montana Farm Bureau Federation annual conference.

Greg Page knows farmers and ranchers are generally skeptical about this topic.

So he opened by asking, “How many people believe we’re seeing climate change?”

About two dozen hands went up and someone yelled out, "It always changes."

Cargill

Greg Page, retired chief executive of Cargill, knows some farmers and ranchers view climate change as part of a liberal agenda. But he says agricultural producers to join the discussion.

The North Dakota-native isn’t interested in a debate over whether climate change exists or what’s the cause.  

"I don’t think we need to become zealots," Page says. "But given the criticality of being able to feed an ever increasing population, I think to be so sure that it’s not happening, that we do nothing or even talk about it or think about it is a mistake."

Jackie Yamanaka

ExxonMobil Pipeline Company agreed to pay 12-million dollars to the federal government and the state of Montana to resolve claims that stem from a 2011 pipeline break that spilled crude oil into the Yellowstone River in Laurel.

A proposed consent decree was filed in U.S. District Court on September 21, 2016 to address the natural resource damage.

Jackie Yamanaka

Supporters of National Parks said to survive the next 100 years, the American public will need to visit and support the sites.

“I had 413 options and I wanted to be in Yellowstone,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis.

He was among the dignitaries who gathered near the Roosevelt Arch, the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park, the country’s first, to celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service.

Jackie Yamanaka

    

The National Parks face many challenges as it enters its next 100 years.

Jonathan Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, is in Yellowstone National Park to celebrate the centennial of the federal agency.

Jarvis worries a lack of public support could be the end of the institution. He says the future of the National Park Service rests with being relevant to an urban, ethnically diverse and technologically plugged-in population.

Jackie Yamanaka

    

Wild Sky Beef is part of American Prairie Reserve’s mission to provide habitat for wildlife.

The for-profit arm of APR is paying its neighboring ranchers if they agree to be wildlife friendly.

Some ranchers in central and northeastern Montana resent APR, and its wealthy backers, for buying or leasing their neighbor’s land and turning loose free-roaming bison.

Jackie Yamanaka

For the first time since the Montana Environmental Stewardship award was first handed out in 1992, ranchers and others got a chance to tour a winning ranch to learn more about strategies be economically viable while conserving the land, water, and wildlife.

Jed Evjene co-manages the American Fork Ranch in Two Dot, Montana with his wife Annie.

The first public meeting over the future of the federal coal leasing program and possibly charging more to mine is underway at the Casper Events Center.

The doors opened for speaker registration at 8:30 this morning. The meeting is scheduled to conclude at 4 this afternoon. The Bureau of Land Management is live-streaming the Casper meeting.

Pages