Greg Gianforte

Dustin White, the Chippewa-Cree tribal water director, stands next to a water storage supply tank on the Rocky Boy's reservation.
Nate Hegyi / YPR

3,000 people might run out of water this summer on the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, but a bipartisan bill moving through U.S. Congress could bring some much-needed relief.

Ken Siebert

Republican Congressman Greg Gianforte came by the YPR studio visit about his first three weeks on the job.  Gianforte was elected in a special May election to fill the vacancy when President Donald Trump tapped then-Congressman Ryan Zinke to become his U.S. Interior Secretary.

In conversation with YPR's Jackie Yamanaka, Gianforte explains he was required to vote on issues immediately.

Ken Siebert

U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-MT) says the U.S. Senate needs to do its job and pass a bill on health care. This on the news that the Senate Majority Leader plans to hold a vote next week even though it is unclear as of Friday what lawmakers will be voting on.

Congressman Greg Gianforte has been assigned to serve on two congressional committees — one focused on natural resources, and the other on government oversight. Republican Greg Gianforte announced his committee assignments on Wednesday.

As a member of the House Natural Resources Committee, Gianforte will help craft policy on a wide range of topics, including public lands, mining, wildlife and Indian country.

Greg Gianforte was officially sworn in as Montana's sole representative in the U.S. House Wednesday.

 

The Republican entrepreneur from Bozeman takes office less than two weeks after pleading guilty to misdemeanor assault for attacking Guardian Reporter Ben Jacobs the evening before in-person voting began in Montana’s special election May 25.

In an interview with MTPR after being sworn in, Gianforte said again that he wants to put the assault behind him.

Montana's incoming congressman called for civility in politics today, four days after his conviction for assaulting a reporter who asked him a question about health care.

Greg Gianforte spoke to The Associated Press at his Bozeman home in his first national interview since winning the May 25 special congressional election. 

 

Congressman Greg Gianforte is asking the Gallatin County Court not to require him to have his mug shot and fingerprints taken.

Montana’s Secretary of State certified the results of the May 25 special election today, naming Greg Gianforte Montana’s next congressman. Gianforte will be  sworn in as Montana’s next congressman Wednesday,  June 21 in the U.S. Capitol.

Montana’s congressional delegation offered responses to the shooting at the congressional baseball practice today.

More than 70,000 Montanans would lose health coverage under the health care bill being considered by Congress, and the state would lose $4.8 billion in federal funding.

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