This weekend, hundreds of thousands of teens are expected to march on Washington D.C. and around the country, calling for gun control. The Mountain West News Bureau spoke with two students in Montana and Wyoming who do not plan to march, and are worried gun control reform could change their way of life.

The national conversation we’re having on guns is particularly painful in Colorado, where Columbine and Aurora are still active wounds. And like the rest of the country, this Mountain West state is deeply divided over what measures to take.

The school shooting in Florida, guns, and mental illness were among the topics the nation's governors, including Montana Governor Steve Bullock, discussed at the White House this week with President Donald Trump. 

Bullock says there are no simple answers to what is becoming a public health crisis with the symbol of a flag at half staff.

Jackie Yamanaka

Former U.S. Ambassador to China and Montana Senator Max Baucus says there’s insufficient critical thinking today.  He says for many, it’s easier to watch or read the news they agree with.  Baucus says as Senator he strove to meet with those who didn’t always agree with him. 

“I love walking into a lion’s den. It’s a challenge,” Baucus says. “You learn something. And basically, they might learn something too.”

Mass shootings in Orlando, Fla., Alexandria, Va., and San Francisco during the first two weeks of June — two of them on the same day — have once again put America's complicate

Jackie Yamanaka

Lawmakers are considering several bills to expand where citizens can carry guns.  This includes one that would allow teachers and other school employees to carry a concealed weapon on school grounds.