Matt Rosendale

Montana Department of Transportation

Driving across the great expanse of Montana isn’t for the faint at heart. During the winter it can be a white knuckle experience with motorists confronting icy and snow packed roads, strong winds, and ground blizzards. Any time of the year critters can jump out on to the roadway.

This is what our candidates for statewide office face as they bounce from one campaign stop to the next on the seemingly endless ribbon of blacktop, gravel, and gumbo roads that connect our far-flung population.   

A photo shared on Twitter by Matt Rosendale in October 2017 / Twitter

A candidate for U.S. Senate in Montana who received an endorsement by former White House strategist Steve Bannon is keeping quiet after Bannon made comments critical of President Trump.

Montana Insurance Commissioner Matt Rosendale says many homeowners insurance policies can help out with evacuation expenses.

“If you’re subject to a mandatory civil evacuation order many insurance policies will provide extra living expense coverage for up to two weeks,” he says.

Creative Commons Flickr

The GOP leadership in the U.S. Senate may have put the health care issue on the back burner, but it is a campaign issue in Montana’s upcoming U.S. Senate race.

The latest Republican to enter U.S. Senate race has run aggressive statewide political campaigns in the past. So it comes as no surprise he didn’t pull any punches against incumbent U.S. Senator Jon Tester, D-MT, right out of the gate during his campaign announcement Monday.

“He was the one that cast the deciding vote that forced Obamacare on each and every person on the state of Montana originally,” said Rosendale. “So that’s sort of like the Arsonist trying to blame the fire department because they’re not doing a good enough job.”

Jackie Yamanaka

State Auditor Matt Rosendale is the most prominent Republican to enter the race to challenge U.S. Senator Jon Tester, D-MT, in 2018.

Rosendale, a former state legislator from Glendive, was elected last November to be Montana’s state Insurance and Securities Commissioner.

“I have always said I will serve where Montanans feel I can be the most effective,” he says.

Montana’s health insurance companies are asking for rate increases for 2018 ranging from 2 percent to 23 percent. Those numbers released today are much lower than the rate increases for last year, some of which topped 50 percent.

The proposed increases are only for the individual and small group markets. Most Montanans get their health coverage elsewhere, either through their jobs or government programs like Medicaid, Medicare and the Veterans Administration.