Native American

Jackie Yamanaka

Saint Vincent Healthcare in Billings joins Benefis Healthcare in Great Falls in employing a health disparities coordinator.

Kassie Runsabove, in conversation with Jackie Yamanaka, talks about her work as a cultural liaison for Montana’s largest minority population – Native Americans.

Jackie Yamanaka

Thousands of people gathered at events across Montana Saturday to participate in this year’s Women’s March. Each event had its own organizers and theme.  

In Billings, the organizers issued this call to action, run for something. State Senator Jen Gross, one of the organizers, says that could be a run for elected office, run to the polls, or to run to a community organization and volunteer.


MSU Billings University Relations

Montana’s Native American children face greater barriers to opportunity than their peers in other states according to the 2017 Race for Results study released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Montana State University-Northern awarded a professor $50,000 to settle a racial discrimination complaint she filed against the school. The University did not admit guilt, but nonetheless agreed to pay the professor.

Adjunct professor Yvonne Tiger, who’s Native American, filed the complaint in July 2016.

While Native Americans may be underrepresented in the "hard sciences," Jade Johnson would argue that now, more than ever, Native scientists are needed to make sure environmental issues don’t get swept under the rug or forgotten.

Johnson, a member of Navajo Nation, is an undergraduate chemistry student at San Diego State University. This summer, she’s doing research at the University of Montana. It’s not the first time she’s done something like this.

Funding for a Native American language preservation program could get cut next month if revenues don’t increase as the state fiscal year comes to an end. 

The State-Tribal Relations Interim Committee was briefed by legislative staff Thursday that budget cuts will be triggered in mid-August.

Amy Carlson, a Legislative Fiscal Analyst, says state revenues have continued falling below projections since lawmakers passed the state budget in April.

“Yes, we believe we will be hitting triggers," Carlson said, "certainly the most recent revenues would tell you that.”

Benjamin Rasmussen for The Wall Street Journal

All seven of the Indian Health Service sanctioned hospitals of the Great Plains region have put patients in "immediate jeopardy" of harm, and failed to meet hospital requirements, according to an article published by the Wall Street Journal today.

This crisis exists even as the 2018 federal budget currently proposes an additional $300 million in cuts to IHS. 

The Wolf Point School District is facing a complaint of discrimination against its Native American students for the second time in the past 15 years. Last week, the Fort Peck Tribes filed what’s called a Title VI complaint with the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education on behalf of their children.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Brie Ripley and Montana Public Radio’s Nicky Ouellet team up to bring us this story.

Fort Peck Tribes File Federal Complaint Against Wolf Point School District

Jun 30, 2017
[url=https://flic.kr/p/risMaC][img]https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8615/16606524482_df2613dabb_k.jpg[/img][/url][url=https://flic.kr/p/risMaC]Globe[/url] by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/litratcher/]Wendy Cope[/url], on Flickr
Wendy Cope

The Assiniboine and Sioux tribes have filed a Title VI complaint against the Wolf Point school district.

This is the first time tribes have filed a complaint to the federal Departments of Justice and Education on their children’s behalf, based on school policy, in a school district that has a majority Native population.  

Courtesy of Inyo Entertainment

Steven Lewis Simpson is a white, European filmmaker telling a story about Native Americans through his latest film screening now across Montana.

“Neither Wolf Nor Dog” is adapted from the 1994 best-selling novel by author Kent Nerburn. It's about a white writer who gets sucked into life on reservations in the Dakotas by the late Lakota Chief, Dave Bald Eagle, whose people were killed in the Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890. Brie Ripley spoke with the filmmaker about the complexities of telling a story that isn’t yours.  

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