Special Election

Greg Gianforte will probably be given more time to appear in court on his misdemeanor assault charge. That’s according Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert.

"I don’t think it’s going to happen Monday or Wednesday of next week," Lambert says.

KULR 8 News

Montana congressman-elect Greg Gianforte apologized to the newspaper reporter he was accused of assaulting and to Montanans after he was declared the winner in Montana’s open U.S. House seat.

“And when you make a mistake you have to own up to it,” he said. “It’s the Montana way.”


(Flickr/Cory Doctorow) (https://flic.kr/p/ehJgea)

Reaction in Montana and around the world to the Gianforte misdemeanor assault charge has been varied. 

California GOP Congressman Duncan Hunter speaking to the press Thursday on Capitol Hill said assaulting a reporter is not appropriate behavior "unless the reporter deserved it," according to a tweet posted by Associated Press reporter Mary Clare Jalonick. 

Montana Standard editor David McComber says he's not surprised by the level of vitriol against the media, and it's not a recent development.

Rachel Hergett

*Updated Thurs. 5/25 at 2:30 p.m. 

GOP Candidate Greg Gianforte faces misdemeanor assault charges for "body slamming" a reporter for The Guardian at his campaign headquarters last night, on the eve of today’s special election to fill Montana’s lone U.S. House Seat. He must appear in Gallatin County Justice Court by June 7. 

Crime reporter Whitney Bermes for the Bozeman Daily Chronicle first heard the assault report on a police scanner, as she was packing up to leave the newsroom and go home for the evening.

This week Republican U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte has been telling his supporters that the race is, “closer than it should be.” MTPR's Corin Cates-Carney dropped in on a Gianforte get-out-the-vote event at Montana GOP headquarters in Helena today.

How to find your polling place, return your absentee ballot, or vote in person in Montana's special election:

The election to fill Montana's U.S. House seat is Thursday, May 25. You have until 8:00 p.m. to cast your ballot.

In the final hours leading up to tomorrow’s special election to fill Montana’s lone U.S. House seat, Democratic candidate Rob Quist is squeezing in a few final visits with voters, and making use of social media. 

Quist’s campaign Facebook and Twitter pages are flooded with testimonials from voters:

Montana’s special election to fill its empty U.S. House seat is mere days away, but election officials say many voters still aren’t sure how to vote.

"The biggest hurdle for us has been trying to combat voter confusion," says Rebecca Connors, the election administrator for Missoula County.

With just three days remaining in the race to become Montana’s next congressman, both major parties are working their ground games. And the candidates are hitting the state’s population centers in final efforts to get their bases to the polls.

In the final week of the special election for Montana’s lone U.S. House seat, Congressional hopefuls are packing in numerous stops around the state.

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