The Governor’s Local Food and Agriculture Summit will be held later this month in Bozeman.  It’s been nearly a decade since former Governor Brian Schweitzer convened the last Summit, a sort of pop-up food think tank, and in that time the state’s local food scene has changed. 

“Nationwide, this focus on local foods has grown dramatically,” said Annie Heuscher, director of the Community Food and Agriculture Coalition

An exhibit of mixed media paintings and a paper sculpture that explores the relationship between written language and visuals images is on display at MSU-Billings through October 13, 2016.

Nishiki  Sugawara-Beda, associate professor of art at the University of Idaho, immigrated to the U.S. from Japan as a young adult.  Her exhibition - "Word Terminal" - is supported by the Idaho Commission on the Arts/National Endowment for the Arts.

Montana organizations joined an effort to ensure eligible adults are registered to vote in this year’s election as part of National Voter Registration Day, Sept. 27.

Kiah Abbey, deputy director for the Forward Montana Foundation, had been working with the League of Women Voters, student governments, businesses and nonprofits across the state to set up places where people can register to vote.

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#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Most races for sheriff are low-profile, relatively low-budget affairs. Not in Arizona's Maricopa County, where Sheriff Joe Arpaio is running for his seventh term.

He's known nationally for his hard-line stance on illegal immigration. Arpaio's base all over the country has helped him raise a stunning $12 million for his re-election campaign, making it one of the most expensive races for local office in the country this year.

Aleppo, Syria's divided city where airstrikes hit two rebel-held hospitals earlier this week, is under renewed attack, as reports emerge that Russian and Syrian forces are using incendiary phosphorous munitions as part of an intensified shelling and bombing campaign.

In 2012, Shimon Peres became hip.

The then-Israeli president was 88 years old at the time, but not too old to shoot this music video asking people around the world to friend him on Facebook:

The video is playful, but Peres was dead serious. With his signature stone-faced expression, he imparted his words of advice to young people.

"Peace is needed. For your future. For your future. For your future," Peres said in the video, his words set to a dance beat.

Michael Twitty wants you to know where Southern food really comes from. And he wants the enslaved African-Americans who were part of its creation to get credit. That's why Twitty goes to places like Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's grand estate in Charlottesville, Va. — to cook meals that slaves would have eaten and put their stories back into American history.

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Montana Supreme Court Candidate Kristen Juras says she would be the only justice who has irrigated a hay field in addition to filing and defending water rights claims. Juras has 34 years of experience representing farmers, ranchers, small business owners, non-profit organizations and individuals in the daily legal issues they face. She currently teaches at the University of Montana School of Law and says she would "bring an area of expertise that is currently lacking in the court."

Kristen Juras makes headlines after her past criticisms of the Kaimin resurface, more campaign ads emerge in the House race, and in the governor’s race the state's rainy day fund has become an issue. Chuck Johnson and Professor Rob Saldin join Sally Mauk to discuss these topics and more on this episode of “Campaign Beat.”

A new survey indicates Montana’s Supreme Court is well-respected by those who use it the most.

The 2016 Bench and Bar survey is essentially a performance review of Montana’s high court.