The Latest from the Montana Legislature

pexels.com

House Approves Smaller Fuel Tax Increase To Fix Roads And Bridges

A bill to increase the fuel tax continues to advance down the road as the Legislative session is moving closer to adjournment. “And I find myself in the middle of Montana in the 65 th Legislative Session in a very odd position where I feel the need to quote Mick Jagger,” said Representative Frank Garner, R-Kalispell. “And that is you don’t always get what you want.”

Read More

YPR News

(Flickr/Kellie Parker) (https://flic.kr/p/mCKgS)

After months of drafting and amending, the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming passed a much debated resolution to fly a flag symbolizing LGBTQ visibility, strength and allyship.

ASUW Vice President Tyler Wolfgang got the idea to fly the flag on campus after a gunman opened fire at a LGBTQ nightclub in Florida and killed 49 people last summer.

"I felt trapped in Laramie working in ASUW when there was no one in the community talking about what happened in Orlando," said Wolfgang. "So I felt that a significant way of showing solidarity and inclusion for the LGBTQ  community during Pride Month—which is in June—in Laramie was well needed."

MT Legislature

The chair of the Montana Republican Party announced today his candidacy for mayor of the state’s largest city. YPR's Jackie Yamanaka caught up with Jeff Essmann, as he’s also a legislator who’s served in both the Senate and House.

 

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jay Hahnkamp is an unlikely children’s author. He’s a rancher with a small place near southwest Montana, and he has two children’s books to his name.

His most recent book carries a simple message: no matter the obstacles in life, a child can strive to be whatever he or she wants to be. This message is carried by the author’s real-life cow and best friend the goat.  


YPR General Manager Search

Meet the Candidates

Flickr

Thank You!

Thank you for a successful spring pledge drive! We surpassed our minimum goal of $210,000 and have counted $234,911 pledges insofar. That's 1,806 individual gifts and 314 brand new donors.

Read More

Latest Episodes Of

Jackie Yamanaka

Capitol Connections: Final Days of Negotiations

The 65th Session of the Montana Legislature is winding down, but there are pieces yet to be put into place before lawmakers can adjourn. Senate Majority Leader Fred Thomas, R-Stevensville, talks about the negotiations taking place with the Governor to bring this session to a close.

Read More

A Michigan emergency manager tied to two major controversies has resigned from his current post running Detroit's public school district.

Darnell Earley has faced escalating criticism over poor conditions in Detroit schools. Before that, he ran the troubled city of Flint. As Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta reports:

"He carried out the now-infamous decision to use the Flint River as a temporary source of drinking water for the city. The untreated corrosive river water caused lead to leach from old pipes into the drinking water.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A memo from congressional investigators sheds new light on the inner workings of Martin Shkreli's Turing Pharmaceuticals after the company jacked up the prices of a decades-old drug used to treat AIDS patients.

The House Committee on Oversight and Investigations is looking into Turing and other drug companies' price increases. This memo, released Tuesday, includes excerpts from the company's internal documents and emails.

BP Earnings Plunge 91 Percent In 4th Quarter

Feb 2, 2016

Global oil and gas price drops have shattered BP's profits.

The British energy giant said Tuesday that its fourth-quarter "underlying replacement cost profits" (or net income) dropped 91 percent. Profits fell to $196 million, compared with $2.2 billion in the year-ago quarter.

The full-year figures were somewhat less dramatic: 2015 profits amounted to $5.9 billion, down from $12.1 billion the previous year. That's a 51 percent drop.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Patients suffered no additional harm when doctors training to be surgeons were allowed to work longer shifts, a study published Tuesday concludes. The findings provide fresh evidence for medical educators looking to relax the strictest limits on resident hours.

Coin tosses, a squeaker of a win and, perhaps even more surprising, humility. That's what marked Monday night's Iowa caucuses, the first votes cast in the 2016 presidential election.

The presidential candidates are now focused on New Hampshire, where polls put Bernie Sanders ahead of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ahead of Ted Cruz, the Union Leader reports. The New Hampshire primaries will be held next Tuesday, Feb. 9.

Here's a roundup of headlines from the morning after the Iowa campaign.

Few States Use Health Law Option For Low-Cost Plans

Feb 2, 2016

In January, more than 350,000 New Yorkers began paying $20 a month or less for comprehensive health insurance with no deductibles and low copayments, for a type of coverage made possible by the federal health law. Minnesota has similar coverage in place through the same option, with more than 125,000 enrollees.

A crowd gathered at Gobbler's Knob early this morning, awaiting the emergence of the groundhog named Punxsutawney Phil. After a tap of a cane on Phil's tree-trunk cage, his door was opened, and the animal emerged.

Police have arrested three teenagers — ages 13, 16, and 17 — who are believed to have carried out last week's deadly attack on a homeless camp in Seattle known as "The Jungle." Two people were killed in the shooting; three more were hospitalized.

Last week, the authorities said they believed the victims were targeted; today, the AP reports that the police think the crime "stemmed from a drug-dealing dispute."

Pages