All Things Considered

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On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m.,  All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

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Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has been at the forefront of progressive politics over the last year.

She has sparred with President Trump on Twitter, and she was reprimanded by Republicans on the Senate floor earlier this year. Now she has written a new book, This Fight Is Our Fight: The Battle To Save America's Middle Class.

President Trump is preparing to overhaul the nation's tax code, and at least some of the coming changes could benefit his own bottom line. Critics say voters should be able to see just how much help the president might get from a revised tax code, so they are stepping up efforts to force him to share his tax returns.

Seeing the returns would reveal some key facts about the president's finances, says Noah Bookbinder, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, or CREW.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg today spoke publicly about the murder in Cleveland for the first time. He brought it up while making remarks at F8, Facebook's annual developer conference. He was discussing the ways Facebook hopes to bring people closer together.

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You wouldn't expect a 73-year-old to be on the crime beat, but Maximino Rodriguez Palacios couldn't help himself, says Cuauhtemoc Morgan, editor of the Baja California news blog Colectivo Pericu.

"It was totally by chance," he tells NPR. "In November 2014, Max called me about a shooting near his home in La Paz. And then he sent me a story and photos about what happened. From that moment, he was our crime reporter."

Office of Government Ethics Director Walter Shaub Jr. is calling on the chairman of House Oversight Committee to become more engaged in overseeing ethics questions in the Trump administration.

In an interview with NPR on Monday, Shaub said public inquiries and complaints involving Trump administration conflicts of interest and ethics have been inundating his tiny agency, which has only advisory power.

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(Flickr/Kellie Parker) (https://flic.kr/p/mCKgS)

After months of drafting and amending, the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming passed a much debated resolution to fly a flag symbolizing LGBTQ visibility, strength and allyship.

ASUW Vice President Tyler Wolfgang got the idea to fly the flag on campus after a gunman opened fire at a LGBTQ nightclub in Florida and killed 49 people last summer.

"I felt trapped in Laramie working in ASUW when there was no one in the community talking about what happened in Orlando," said Wolfgang. "So I felt that a significant way of showing solidarity and inclusion for the LGBTQ  community during Pride Month—which is in June—in Laramie was well needed."

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