Donald Trump

Jackie Yamanaka / Yellowstone Public Radio

A bipartisan group of indigenous state lawmakers just published a letter condemning the President’s use of the name “Pocahontas” in a recent Montana rally. They say it hurts the already-wounded image of Native American women.

President Donald Trump rallies in Great Falls, Montana.
Jackie Yamanaka / Yellowstone Public Radio

At Thursday’s Montana rally, President Donald Trump repeatedly called Democratic U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren “Pocahontas.” Montana is home to eight tribal nations and more than 60,000 Native Americans.  

Jackie Yamanaka/YPR

Supporters of President Donald Trump began to line up outside the gates at Great Falls’ Montana Expo Park before dawn, even though the campaign rally wasn’t scheduled to start until 4 p.m.  Protesters also were on the grounds, but local officials kept them separated from supporters.

Jackie Yamanaka/YPR

Over 6,000 people crowded into the Expo Park in Great Falls for President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in support of the Republican U.S. Senate candidate Matt Rosendale.  The current state auditor and former state legislator won the GOP’s contested June and will be one of the candidates facing Democratic U.S. Senator Jon Tester on the November General Election ballot.

Democratic U.S. Senator Jon Tester is hoping Montanans will give him a narrow victory this fall.

But President Donald Trump isn’t making it easy.

States in the Mountain West sell everything from beef to computer parts to China.
J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

Ranchers and farmers in the Mountain West ship a lot of products overseas to China. Now the Trump administration is expected to hit China with $60 billion dollars worth of annual tariffs.

Last year China opened its doors to U.S. beef for the first time in more than a decade.

Montana ranchers jumped at the opportunity. They signed a multi-million dollar deal with a large Chinese company to sell beef.

George Haynes, an economist with Montana State University, wonders what the retaliation is going to be if the Trump administration slaps these tariffs on China.

The Trump administration's aluminum tariffs could cost thousands of dollars for breweries in the Mountain West.
Nate Hegyi / Mountain West News Bureau

There are hundreds of microbreweries scattered across the Mountain West. In fact, in parts of our region there are more breweries per capita than most anywhere else in the country.

Many of them sell their beers in aluminum cans. So with the Trump administration’s proposal to slap a steep tariff on imported aluminum, the beer industry is feeling nervous.

Senator Jon Tester meets with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Tuesday.
Office of Jon Tester

Montana’s Democratic Senator Jon Tester is part of a bipartisan group of lawmakers trying to strike a new deal with the White House on border security.

Tester this week met with the Secretary of Homeland Security and a bipartisan group of lawmakers. He’s hoping to help push a border security plan through Congress as part of a long-term budget agreement.

Senator Steve Daines hosting a tele-town hall on Tuesday, January 16th
Senator Steve Daines / Facebook

As Congressional Democrats and Republicans continue to fight over the fate of undocumented immigrants in the DACA program, the federal government is barreling towards a shutdown Friday.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Nate Hegyi sat down with Montana’s Republican Senator, Steve Daines, to talk about the potential for a shutdown, his legislative goals in 2018 and President Trump’s salty language.

Nate Hegyi / YPR

President Trump and members of Congress are trying to strike a deal over border security and the fate of undocumented immigrants under the DACA program. But on Wednesday a judge put a temporary hold on Trump’s plan to end DACA in March.

The president met with a bipartisan group of lawmakers before the ruling this week, including Montana Democratic Senator Jon Tester.  He spoke with Yellowstone Public Radio’s Nate Hegyi after the meeting about border walls, weed, and his top priorities for 2018.

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