Women's March

Jackie Yamanaka

U.S. Senator Jon Tester, facing a tough re-election campaign this year, is hoping women voters will give him the push he needs to be elected to a third term in this increasingly Republican-leaning state.

The Democrat says history will determine whether the Women’s March was a moment or a movement still, “It certainly has the feel of a movement at this moment in time.”

Jackie Yamanaka

Thousands of people gathered at events across Montana Saturday to participate in this year’s Women’s March. Each event had its own organizers and theme.  

In Billings, the organizers issued this call to action, run for something. State Senator Jen Gross, one of the organizers, says that could be a run for elected office, run to the polls, or to run to a community organization and volunteer.

Dark Sevier, Flickr at https://goo.gl/dqGgLN

State Senator Jen Gross of Billings wants participants at this year's Women's March to leave the event with mission. She says the lack of a "call to action" was a missed opportunity at the inaugural gathering last year at the state Capitol in Helena. In conversation with YPR's Jackie Yamanaka, Gross says she wants to channel the energy and enthusiasm people have after the event into action for change.

(Courtesy of Women's March Montana)/(https://www.womensmarchmontana.com/)

This Saturday, people across the state are headed to the Capitol in Helena to participate in the Women's March on Montana in conjunction with marches across the world.

Many are traveling from southeastern Montana, for different reasons, but united by a common message: Women's rights are human rights.