YPRnews

Running Weasel of the Blackfoot Confederacy sits on horseback near the historic Roosevelt Arch near Yellowstone National Park.
Nate Hegyi / YPR

Tribal leaders from Canada and the American West gathered in Yellowstone National Park on Saturday. They were there to protest places named after early explorers who advocated for the mass killing of Native Americans.

Kay Erickson

The Billings Public Library has found a novel way to call attention to books that have been banned for one reason or another.

Billings Library Foundation is hosting a scavenger hunt the last week of this month, Sept. 24-30, 2017, National Banned Books Week.

Some of the publications banned in recent years include the Hunger Games, Pulitzer Prize winner Beloved, and Brave New World.

Jim Peaco / NPS

Yellowstone National Park biologists have euthanized a grizzly bear with a history of exhibiting bold behavior toward humans.

Even after being captured, tagged and relocated to the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in 2015, Yellowstone Public Information Officer Jason Schafer says the bear was undeterred.

Nate Hegyi / YPR

In central Montana, drones are dropping peanut butter pellets on prairie dog colonies. It’s part of of an effort by biologists at the UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge to save North America’s most endangered mammal.

Flickr Creative Commons

Tribes are gathering in Yellowstone National Park this weekend to demand two place names change. Leaders of the Blackfoot Confederacy and Great Sioux Nation are fed up that Hayden Valley and Mount Doan memorialize men who advocated for the genocide of Native Americans.

Keeping Montanans up to date on all the fires burning in the state is a challenge in this unprecedented fire season.  

The Bureau of Land Management office for Montana and the Dakotas has been meeting that challenge since September 1, 2017 using social media.

Jackie Yamanaka

A film describing what it was like to grow up in Missoula, the son of a Presbyterian minister who held two things sacred–God and fly-fishing–had its world premiere in 1992 in Bozeman, Montana.

25-years later, a festival was held to recognize how Norman Maclean's modest novella captured his family’s troubled story, and introduced a worldwide audience to the beauty of Montana, its rivers, and fly fishing.

"In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean" was a 3-day festival that wrapped up Sunday in Missoula. It was held to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the release of the movie, “A River Runs Through It.”

National Weather Service

This was the second driest summer on record in Montana, but meteorologists say rain is finally on the way. 

Since July, the state has seen towns threatened by wildfires and choked with smoke, crops getting killed by drought and grass fires destroying rangeland. 

But a cold and rainy system entering Montana Thursday could put at least a temporary end to the suffering.